Conquest in Cyberspace: National Security and Information Warfare

Dublin Core

Title

Conquest in Cyberspace: National Security and Information Warfare

Description

Main Argument: This book addresses the issue of what conquest means in cyberspace because the perimeter of that space is undefined. Libicki argues that warfare in cyberspace is significantly different than in conventional locations (i.e. land, air, space, sea). It is hard to directly control the real world by controlling cyberspace. Instead, the purpose of controlling cyberspace should be to change minds by exposing them to different ideas.

Style: Academic

Sourcing: Scholarly footnotes are included as well as popular sources

Structure: The book consists of 11 subdivided chapters.

Context in discussion: Libicki recognizes that information and information systems are easily merged, but are two different objects. Expertise at information systems or cyberspace is difficult because it is such a broad, intangible space. Further, cyberspace is given more credit as a dangerous threat than it should be.

Context in website: Libicki's book fits into the Alternative Viewpoints Collection. His skepticism of the threat cyber attacks pose aligns with Schneier and Yoran’s position.

Creator

Libicki, Martin C.

Credentials:

  • Senior management scientist at the RAND Corporation (1998-Current) 
  • Faculty in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University Source

 

Zotero

Collection

Tags

Citation

Libicki, Martin C. Credentials: Senior management scientist at the RAND Corporation (1998-Current) Faculty in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University Source , "Conquest in Cyberspace: National Security and Information Warfare," in Cyberwar Resources Guide, Item #25, https://www.projectcyw-d.org/resources/items/show/25 (accessed November 30, 2021).